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Sunday, May 15, 2011

Doubts by Reader-Woodborer Infestation



A friend of mine called me up and asked me about woodborer infestation. Apparently, his brother's aquarium stand was infested with woodborer. He was asking for my advice on how to get rid of it.

Well, normally when I was questioned on woodborer infestation, the first question that come to my mind will be, 'Is the infested object expensive to you?' If you think the infested object does not cost you much, the best solution will be disposed it. Secondly come by inspection at the rest of the furnitures. A simple explanation on checking of your furnitures will be like this. If B get infested, higher chance for the next object to get infested will be A and C. So, check it out!

Pest controller can carry out treatment at your infested object by applying a layer of chemical onto the surface, which believe with the absorptance of 1 to 2 mm into the wood panel. However, there is no 100% guarantee on not having reinfestation. Just a reminder, in whatever pest that you are dealing with, when you come to pest control, there's no 100% guarantee in controlling.

Second option in controlling will be fumigation. Fumigation is not a cheap treatment. Most of the time, fumigation will be the only option for the customer if the wood is their bread and butter business. Or else, it's worth for you either to dispose the infested object or choosing the option on the surface chemical application.

Let's try to understand more on woodborer's life cycle.


(The above diagram does not belong to Carron Lee. It is an extract from internet)

QUOTED TEXT FROM THE DIAGRAM


Wood Borer Life Cycle
Wood borers are tiny beetles whose larva feed extensively in the wood. The adults make tiny pin head size holes on the surface of woods before flying out. The adult as soon as it attacks the wood of your furniture it, within 1 to 35 days after mating lays the egg on or inside the wood; soon the egg hatches & transforms into larva. Then it further matures into Pupa inside the wood surface & soon develops into an adult ‘WOOD BORER’.

When will you know that your furnitures are infested with wood borers? You will know when you find saw dust. Take a look at the below photo.


(The above photo does not belong to Carron Lee. It is an extract from internet)

When you see this, it's time for you to decide which option you want to choose in getting rid of the woodborer. Besides that, do you know that by determine the size of the hole, it will actually tell you a rough idea on what type of borers are you facing?



How to identify common beetles, bees and wasps that attack wood.
Shape and Size (inches) of Exit/ Entry Hole
Wood Type
Age
of Wood At- tacked
Appearance of Frass in Tunnels
Insect Type
Re- infest?
Round 1/50 - 1/8
Softwood & hardwood
New
None Present
Ambrosia beetles
No
Round 1/32 - 1/16
Hardwood
New & old
Fine, flour-like, loosely packed
Lyctid beetles
No
Round 1/16 - 3/32
Bark/ sapwood interface
New
Fine to coarse, bark colored, tightly packed
Bark beetles
No
Round 1/16 - 1/8
Softwood & hardwood
New & old
Fine powder and pellets, loosely packed; pellets may be absent and frass tightly packed in some hardwoods
Anobiid beetles
Yes
Round 3/32 - 9/32
Softwood & hardwood (bamboo)
New
Fine to coarse powder, tightly packed
Bostrichid beetles
Rarely
Round 1/6 - 1/4
Softwood
New
Coarse, tightly packed
Horntail or woodwasp
No
Round 1/2
Softwood
New & old
None Present
Carpenter bee
Yes
Round-oval 1/8 - 3/8
Softwood & hardwood
New
Coarse to fibrous, mostly absent
Round- headed borer
No
Oval 1/8 - 1/2
Softwood & hardwood
New
Sawdust-like, tightly packed
Flat-headed borer
No
Oval 1/4 - 3/8
Softwood
New & old
Very fine powder & tiny pellets, tight
Old house borer
Yes
Flat oval 1/2 or more or irregular surface groove 1/8 - 1/2 wide
Softwood & hardwood
New
Absent or sawdust-like, coarse to fibrous; tightly packed
Round- or flat-headed borer, wood machined after attack
No
(New wood is defined as standing or freshly felled trees and unseasoned lumber. Old wood is seasoned or dried lumber.)


(The above table does not belong to Carron Lee. It is an extract from internet)

There are many types of wood borers. When I was a Field Biologist, I came across with lesser grain beetle, powderpost beetle and etc. When you search from internet, those photos were nicely captured with their high resolution microscope and it is totally different when you see with your naked eyes. If you are interested to find out type of species, it is advisable for you to send to a qualified Entomologist and insect identification needs to be carried out with their microscopes. 

Let's have a tour on some of my woodborer photos collection. It shows the pattern and hole of infestation. All the below photos do not belong to Carron Lee and are extracts from internet.




























I still remember few years back when my husband and I first bought a new house, I was intended to get some wooden window blind for my dry kitchen. I went for furnitures browsing and just a minute before I grabbed the blind, I saw saw-dust scattering on the role of the blinds. I wondered other buyers will notice it but I was sure that it was infested with wood borers. Therefore, I changed my mind in the end.

The first tip in getting rid of the wood borer, will be...Be more observant on the furnitures that you are going to purchase. Ensure that there's no hole and saw dust. If you overlook at this point, you may invite unwanted insect to your house and the next challenge will be forking out money from your pocket for the treatment.





1 comment:

  1. Just found that I had a wood borer problem in my bathroom cabinet. What alerted me was the noise that was coming from the door. There were no holes, but I had noticed a bit of bubbling on the inner part of the door. Initially I believed that it was from water, but I decided to investigate, the door was infested, all of the wood had turned to powder. I have no idea how this started, but the only solution now is to have new doors made for the unit. I'm hoping that it is still confined to the one area !!

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